Catherine DeRose

British Literature | Digital Humanities | Media Studies

 

Teaching and Mentorship Awards (UW-Madison)

  • Capstone Teaching Award recipient, nominated by the English Department, Fall 2015

  • Honored Instructor Award recipient, nominated by students, Fall 2014

  • Best TA Award recipient, nominated by students and awarded by UW-Madison Undergraduate Society for English (MUSE), Spring 2014

  • Outstanding Instructor Award nominee, nominated by fellow instructors, Spring 2013

  • Honored Instructor Award recipient, nominated by students, Fall 2012

  • Graduate Student Peer Mentor Award recipient, nominated by fellow graduate students, Spring 2012

Invited Instructor

Workshop Instructor (Yale University)

I regularly teach workshops on digital humanities methods for research and teaching, tailoring my lessons to account for disciplinarily and demographically mixed audiences that have included undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, staff, non-academics, and K-12 audiences. My most frequently taught workshops are included below.

Programming & Web Design

  • Software Carpentry: Python, the Unix Shell, Git

  • Library Carpentry: OpenRefine, Python, the Unix Shell

  • Creating Websites with GitHub Pages

  • Version Control with Git and GitHub

Data Visualization & Digital Humanities

  • Introduction to Data Visualization with Tableau

  • Introduction to Digital Humanities: Texts, Spaces, Networks

  • Scaling Up (or Down): Project Management in the Digital Humanities

Text & Image Analysis

  • Introduction to Named Entity Recognition (from the command line and with a graphical user interface)

  • Introduction to Topic Modeling (with Mallet and with Topic Modeling Tool)

  • Applications of Neural Style Transfer

Geospatial & Network Analysis

  • Maps, Graphs, & Data Dashboards

  • Introduction to ArcGIS Online

  • Telling a Story with Data: Introduction to Story Maps

  • Introduction to Network Analysis with Gephi

  • Reading Romeo and Juliet as a Network Graph

Guest Lecturer (Yale University)

  • “Digital Humanities Methods, Tools, and Publics.” Introduction to Public Humanities. Undergraduate and graduate seminar. Professor Ryan Brasseaux. Fall 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016

  • “Introduction to Network Analysis.” Fundamentals of Working with People. Graduate seminar. Professor Stuart DeCew. Spring 2019

  • “Digital Humanities Applications in History.” Research Seminar in U.S. Political Economy. Graduate seminar. Professor Jennifer Klein. Spring 2019

  • “Visualizing Austen and Scott: Text Mining and Network Graphs.” Jane Austen and Walter Scott: History and Manners in the Romantic Novel. Undergraduate seminar. Professor Anastasia Eccles. Fall 2018

  • “Mapping Urban Landscapes.” Inequality and the American Metropolis, 1880-1999. Undergraduate seminar. Instructor Nichole Nelson. Fall 2018

  • “Creating a Digital Atlas: Collecting, Mapping, and Sharing Data.” New Orleans in the American Imaginary. Professors Crystal Feimster and Joseph Fischel. Undergraduate seminar. Spring 2018

  • “Introduction to the Digital Humanities.” Performing American Literature. Undergraduate and graduate seminar. Professor Wai Chee Dimock. Spring 2018, 2017

  • “Ethics, Accessibility, and Evaluation in Digital Humanities.” Minimal DH. Undergraduate seminar. Professor Laura Wexler. Spring 2017

  • Workshop on Story Maps. Minimal DH. Undergraduate seminar. Professor Laura Wexler. Spring 2017

  • “Introduction to Network Theory." History 431J: Family and Empire. Undergraduate seminar. Professor Julia Stephens. Spring 2016

  • "What is a Network and How can You Tell?” Co-lecture with Lauren Tilton (American Studies). Mellon Seminar: (En)Visualizing Knowledge. Graduate seminar. Professors Laura Wexler and Inderpal Grewal. Fall 2016

Instructor (UW-Madison)

  • English 100: Introduction to Composition. Undergraduate seminar. Fall 2014.

  • Integrated Liberal Studies 138: Foundations of a Liberal Education. Undergraduate seminar. Fall 2014.

  • Integrated Liberal Studies 138: Foundations of a Liberal Education. Undergraduate seminar. Fall 2013.

  • English 100: Introduction to Composition. Undergraduate seminar. Spring 2013

  • English 100: Introduction to Composition. Undergraduate seminar. Fall 2012

Teaching Assistant (UW-Madison)

  • Shakespeare in Community.” MOOC course. Instructors Jesse Stommel (UW-Madison), Sarah Marty (UW-Madison), R L Widmann (Folger Shakespeare Library). Spring 2015

  • English 216: British and Anglophone Literature from 1750 to the present. Undergraduate seminar. Professor Caroline Levine. Spring 2014

  • English 216: British and Anglophone Literature from 1750 to the present. Undergraduate seminar. Professor Colin Gillis. Fall 2013

  • English 764: Digital Study of Renaissance Literature. Graduate seminar. Professor Michael Witmore. Spring 2011

Guest Lecturer (UW-Madison)

  • “Digital Methods and the Victorian Serial Novel.” English 845: Seriality in the Nineteenth Century. Graduate seminar. Professor Susan Bernstein. UW-Madison, Fall 2013

  • “Victorian Eyes: From Project Design to Grant Applications to Implementation.” Design Studies 469: Art Enterprise: Art as Business. Undergraduate seminar. Professor Sarah Marty. UW-Madison, Fall 2013

  • “‘I Shall Kill No Albatross’: Introduction to Frankenstein.” English 216: British and Anglophone Literature from 1750 to the present. Undergraduate seminar. Professor Colin Gillis. UW-Madison, Fall 2013

  • “Text Analysis on Micro and Macro Scales.” English 960: Seminar in Digital Approaches to British Literature, 1470-1800. Graduate seminar. Professor Robin Valenza. UW-Madison, Spring 2013

  • “Ann Radcliffe and the Supernatural Explained in The Romance of the Forest.” English 442: The Eighteenth Century Gothic Novel. Undergraduate seminar. Professor Robin Valenza. UW-Madison, Spring 2011